The Rundown


Senior Director of Community at XPRIZE

I lead community development and growth at the XPRIZE Foundation.

Formerly Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical and Community Management consultant working with clients including Deutsche Bank, Sony Mobile, Samsung, IBM, SAP, Dyson, GENIVI, and others.


Leader in Community Management

Authored the critically acclaimed The Art of Community and Dealing With Disrespect, founder of the annual Community Leadership Summit, and founder of the Community Leadership Forum.

Advisor to organizations including AlienVault, Open Networking Foundation, and Open Cloud Consortium.



In addition to writing The Art of Community and Dealing With Disrespect, authored The Official Ubuntu Book, Linux Desktop Hacks, and Practical PHP/MySQL.

Columnist for Forbes and opensource.com. Formerly columnist for Linux Format.


Keynote Speaker

Keynote speaker at OSCON, .se Internet Days, FISL, MySQL Conference, OpenNetworking Summit, LinuxCon, Ohio LinuxFest, SCALE, Southeast LinuxFest, and others.

Podcaster and Musician

Co-founder of the Bad Voltage, LugRadio, and Shot Of Jaq podcasts.

Released more than five albums, all freely available to download.

Free Beer, Prizes, and Bad Voltage in Fulda Tonight!

Tonight, Wed 30th September 2015 at 7pm there are five important reasons why you should be in Fulda in Germany: A live Bad Voltage show that will feature technology discussion, competitions, and plenty of fun. Free beer. The chance to win an awesome Samsung Galaxy Tab S2. Free entry (including the beer!). A chance to meet some awesome people. It is going to be a blast and we hope you can make it out here tonight. Just remember, you might leave with one of these: Doors open tonight at 7pm, show starts at 7.30pm at: Hall 8 University of Applied Science Fulda, Leipziger Str. 123, 36037 Fulda, Germany We hope to see you...

Bad Voltage Live in Germany: 30th Sep 2015

Some of you may know that I do a podcast called Bad Voltage with some friends; Stuart Langridge, Bryan Lunduke, and Jeremy Garcia. The show covers Open Source, technology, politics, and more, and features interviews, reviews, and plenty of loose, fun, and at times argumentative discussion. On Wed 30th Sep 2015, the Bad Voltage team will be doing a live show as part of the OpenNMS Users Conference. The show will be packed with discussion, surprises, contests, and give-aways. The show takes place at the University Of Applied Sciences in Fulda, Germany. The address: University of Applied Science Fulda, Leipziger Str. 123, 36037 Fulda, Germany Tel: +49 661 96400 For travel details of how to get there see this page. Everyone is welcome to join and you don’t have to be joining the OpenNMS Users Conference to see the live Bad Voltage show. There will be a bunch of Ubuntu folks, SuSE folks, Linux folks, and more joining us. Also, after the show we plan on keeping the party going – it is going to be a huge amount of fun. To watch the show, we have a small registration fee of €5. You can register here. While this is a nominal fee, we will also have some free beer and giveaways, so you will get your five euros worth. So, be sure to come on join us. You can watch a fun show and meet some great people. REGISTER FOR THE SHOW NOW; space is limited, so register...

Go and back the Mycroft Kickstarter campaign

Disclaimer: I am not a member of the Mycroft team, but I think this is neat and an important example of open innovation that needs support. Mycroft is an Open Source, Open Hardware, Open APIs product that you talk to and it provides information and services. It is a wonderful example of open innovation at work. They are running a kickstarter campaign that is pretty close to the goal, but it needs further backers to nail it. I recorded a short video about why I think this is important. You can watch it here. I encourage you to go and back the campaign. This kind of open innovation across technology, software, hardware, and APIs is how we make the world a better and more hackable...

Ubuntu, Canonical, and IP

Recently there has been a flurry of concerns relating to the IP policy at Canonical. I have not wanted to throw my hat into the ring, but I figured I would share a few simple thoughts. Firstly, the caveat. I am not a lawyer. Far from it. So, take all of this with a pinch of salt. The core issue here seems to be whether the act of compiling binaries provides copyright over those binaries. Some believe it does, some believe it doesn’t. My opinion: I just don’t know. The issue here though is with intent. In Canonical’s defense, and specifically Mark Shuttleworth’s defense, they set out with a promise at the inception of the Ubuntu project that Ubuntu will always be free. The promise was that there would not be a hampered community edition and full-flavor enterprise edition. There will be one Ubuntu, available freely to all. Canonical, and Mark Shuttleworth as a primary investor, have stuck to their word. They have not gone down the road of the community and enterprise editions, of per-seat licensing, or some other compromise in software freedom. Canonical has entered multiple markets where having separate enterprise and community editions could have made life easier from a business perspective, but they haven’t. I think we sometimes forget this. Now, from a revenue side, this has caused challenges. Canonical has invested a lot of money in engineering/design/marketing and some companies have used Ubuntu without contributing even nominally to it’s development. Thus, Canonical has at times struggled to find the right balance between a free product for the Open Source community and revenue. We have...

Talking with a Mythbuster and a Maker

Recently I started writing a column for Forbes. My latest column covers the rise of the maker movement and in it I interviewed Jamie Hyneman from Mythbusters and Dale Dougherty from Make Magazine. Go and give it a read right...