Looking For An Ubuntu Cloud Community Liaison

I am pleased to announce that I am looking for an additional full-time paid role on my team at Canonical, working for me and working alongside David Planella, Jorge Castro and Daniel Holbach. This is an incredibly exciting opportunity to build, energize and develop a cloud-focused community as part of the Ubuntu landscape and beyond. I am looking for a motivated, technically savvy, inspiring and hard-working addition to the team, and you think that person is you, I would love you to apply!

Here is the job description:


Ubuntu Cloud Community Liaison

  • Job Location: Your home (given appropriate facilities including broadband Internet)
  • Job Summary: To build, maintain and develop a cohesive, productive and effective Ubuntu cloud community.
  • Reports To: Community Team Manager

Key responsibilities

  • Build and maintain a strong cloud community and act as a point of reference for this community in continuing its growth and opportunities whilst resolving issues.
  • Build and maintain web-base software to support this community, produce content for these systems and build community participation to generate and optimize the system and its content for and from the community.
  • Develop and refine better working practises to ease and improve how external projects interact with the Ubuntu Cloud platform and how updates, revisions and changes flow between Ubuntu and these projects, and vice versa.
  • Work to advise and improve Ubuntu as a development and source platform for the cloud.
  • Liaise with the Ubuntu Platform Team to better align the feature direction of the Ubuntu Cloud community.
  • Regularly acquire and evaluate feedback from the community and our partners to help improve the Ubuntu Cloud and its development process.
  • Be responsive and sensitive to the concerns, ambitions and direction of the community, our cloud upstreams and business units inside Canonical.

Required skills and experience

  • Strong networking and social networking skills, good relationship building abilities
  • Good web development experience in Python language
  • Experience of working with Community Open Source projects
  • Technical experience with using cloud-related technology such as Amazon Web Services, including EC2, S3 and image manipulation
  • Experience of using Ubuntu, the cloud and the Open Source and upstream/downstream development process.
  • Strong public speaking skills
  • Strong English language communication skills
  • Comfortable with online communication and collaboration such as mailing lists, IRC, wiki
  • Ability to be productive in a globally distributed team through self-discipline and self-motivation, delivering according to a schedule.

If you are interested in applying, please don’t email me directly, but instead go here and click the apply link at the bottom. Good luck!

  • http://betterubuntu.org Greg

    Ubuntu hasn’t had the best track record with sexism in recent times. Since Canonical consistently requires open source experience, it would be interesting to get your response to:

    http://geekfeminism.org/2010/04/09/is-requiring-open-source-experience-sexist/

    or:

    http://codeanthem.com/blog/index.php/2010/03/should-you-judge-a-developer-by-their-open-source-contributions/

  • http://www.thetechandcents.com Alex Lourie

    Greg

    I don’t think that the requirement of experience with Open Source projects is problematic here. Canonical is a company that works with Open Source probably 99% of the time, its main workforce engaged in Open Source by the fact of their employment, and the main thing they do is basically Open Source.

    Why is requiring Python experience seems legitimate to you and social experience of working withing specific social structure is not?

    Why does it get special treatment?

  • http://betterubuntu.org Greg

    Thanks for taking the time to reply Alex, perhaps you should take a minute to read the links more carefully.

    The basic premise isn’t challenging the value of open source experience. It’s that women are drastically underrepresented in the open source software movement. So, by requiring open source experience, you’re excluding women in your hiring process.

  • http://www.thetechandcents.com Alex Lourie

    Greg

    Although I can’t speak for Jono, I’m sure that if a woman candidate would apply to this job, her being participant in an open source projects would come second to her technical knowledge and professional experience.