Call For Hackers: Severed Fifth Desktop App

We have an absolutely rocking development platform in the Ubuntu, GNOME, KDE and Linux and world. Today I was chatting to some of the Severed Fifth Street Team folks and we were talking about how awesome a Severed Fifth Desktop App could be. Imagine an app that shows you recent news, pops up notification bubbles when new Severed Fifth tweets are posted, has a small in-built media player for playing Severed Fifth music easily, has an embedded IRC channel so you can meet the Severed Fifth community and more. This could be a super cool app for Street Team members and Severed Fifth fans to use.

I wrote some ideas for the app and while I would love to hack on it, all of my spare time is taken with rehearsing with the band and getting ready for the album.

As such, I wanted to put the call out to see if any of you would be interested in hacking on a Severed Fifth Desktop App.

See the post here and follow up there if interested – thanks in advance to everyone who helps! :-)

  • Anon

    No one wants an “all-in-one” desktop application, there are a lot of awful example of this behavior, especially under MS Windows. An IRC client shouldn’t be a twitter client and it shouldn’t be a music player. It’s against everything UNIX has taught us.

    Imagine an app that shows you recent news it’s called RSS Reader

    pops up notification bubbles when new Severed Fifth tweets are posted it’s called Twitter client

    has a small in-built media player for playing Severed Fifth music easily Just share the mp3s/flacs/whatevers and let anyone use their favorite music player. Should I use a different player for each band I listen to?

    has an embedAded IRC channel so you can meet the Severed Fifth community Again, there are a lot of irc clients that do the jobs wonderfully

    Anyway, all this could be done in a web application, that would make more sense IMHO.

  • jono

    You could argue that any graphical app is “against everything UNIX has taught us”, but there is value there.

    The kind of app I am talking about is inspired by the new generation of mobile and tablet apps – branded apps that serve a specific purpose well, such as keeping up to date and engaged in Severed Fifth.

  • http://www.jaduncan.com James Duncan

    Ironically, a web browser is surely just the kind of compilation of code that you argue against. We moved on from elinks.

  • Anon

    I’m talking about “Write programs that do one thing and do it well”. [1] Web browers usually are just web browser, sure SeaMonkey (is it still alive?) integrates a mail client, a HTML editor and FSM knows what else, but it’s not very popular, is it? Chrom(e|ium) has gained a lot of user because it does just one thing and it does it fast (and good).

    There was a time when CD burning programs became multimedia suite that tried to handle every file format on earth, and nobody liked it. They were slow, heavy on memory and they didn’t a good job.

    Again, I am a music fan, I like a lot of bands, am I supposed to install a different application for each band I like? How many desktop applications should I have running in this very moment?

    One usually thinks “I want to know what’s new”, so he opens his feed reader and checks what’s new. Hey, I want to listen to music, let’s open my music player.

    Today we have an information overload, we simply have to use a single tool that aggregates information in a nice way for us, from a lot of sources; we don’t use tens of different applications that do the very same thing, but for only a single source.

    This is why stuff like Facebook is popular, you open one website and you have all your friends there. You see what’s going on in your circle of friends. Couldn’t you talk to them by email or IM? Sure, but would it be feasible to send tens of emails just to share a thought?

    Information from different sources should come to us, not the other way.

    In a CS point of view it’s like polling vs events.

    [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_philosophy

  • Anon

    You could argue that any graphical app is “against everything UNIX has taught us”, but there is value there.

    No, Brasero burns CD and that’s it, Totem plays movies and that’s it, GIMP edits images and that’s it. GVIM/GEdit edit text files. They do one thing and they do it (kinda) well.

    The kind of app I am talking about is inspired by the new generation of mobile and tablet apps – branded apps that serve a specific purpose well, such as keeping up to date and engaged in Severed Fifth.

    I don’t see “being engaged in Severed Fifth” as a single purpose: playing music by Severed Fifth is not the same thing as looking for news about the band, nor is talking to its community, it’s not something you do necessarily at the same time. That’s like saying I need a single application to talk to my girlfriend, write to her, look at her photos, read her statuses on Facebook, keep her recipes database and so on.

    Even on smartphones you use a single application to listen to your whole music collection, one for browse the web, etc. I know you would use framework like WebKit, GStreamer and Telepathy that make the job much easier, but there still is a pointless (IMHO) duplication of effort.

  • http://www.patacrep.com crep4ever

    Sure, emacs is just a text editor, a makefile only compiles c code and I should not use vlc for my webcam ;)

    Joke apart, I got your point and I truly don’t think that a big fat whole interface is a good idea. As mentioned, the point is that “less is more” … don’t over display info on my desktop when I just want to listen to music ;)

    Plus, an app that covers so many different domains .. eeek, no one will ever be rock solid !

    Maybe gnome should merge all modules in a single GtkUltimateWidget. Maybe not.