Three Point Blogging; An Experiment

I have an interesting idea I wanted to share that I am calling Three Point Blogging, and I am keen to get your input on this. Feel free to use that daintily prepared comment box, rummaging around at the bottom of this post, to share your feedback and ideas.

Blogging has lost some of its luster to me somewhat. I don’t enjoy nor have the time to read large swathes of text, and I don’t have the time to produce large swathes of text either. I suspect others feel this way too, hence the promulgation of tl;dr summarizing these wordy manifests. It is common theory too that most people take three points away from a presentation or article, and as such these textual overlords are somewhat overloading readers, who are often dipping into your blog in-between emails or meetings.

As such, I am inviting you folks to join me in a little experiment I am calling Three Point Blogging. Inspired by Twitter, and with a focus on content as opposed to word count, TPB blog entries should make three core points, spread across three paragraphs. This keeps entries short and sweet, focused on the core points, and more digestible. What’s more, this might encourage a little more playful word-smithing that is often lost when constructing the Berlin Wall of text. Now, this won’t apply to all posts, but I think it could apply to the majority of them, so I am giving it a shot. Anyone else interested in trying?

  • http://twitter.com/jspaleta Jef Spaleta

    I’m game. (first point/paragraph)

    I’m commit to the 3 point/3 paragraph rules of the game in my replies when the 3 point rule is in play in the original article. (second point/paragraph)

    SPOOOOOOOOOOON! (third point/paragraph)

  • http://twitter.com/Sweetshark1 Bjoern Michaelsen

    If you make it three paragraphs with five, seven, five sentences you could call it haiku blogging ;)

  • Justin moore

    I’m not a blogger myself but I think TPB is a thing to test out. At the end of the day it’s all about content so it is only logical to focus on it. I’ll be keeping up with your posts to see how things are turning out. Until then, keep up the good work.

  • http://erielookingproductions.info Stephen Michael Kellat

    Did you wander over to the ministry school up at Pepperdine? This sounds like old-fashioned advice within the brotherhood for preaching. This should be an interesting experiment to observe.

  • http://RicardoFeliciano.me/ Ricardo N Feliciano

    Should we start expecting TPB to be a new term now? Hmmmmm

    I like it. Let’s see how it comes along.

  • Ian Weisser

    So…”Be concise?” So…”Organize?” My tenth grade english teacher, Mr Kanelis. 25 years ago.

  • Anonymous

    Have you ever seen Mr Kanelis and myself in the same room at the same time? ;-)

  • http://www.refugeeks.com/ Kev Quirk

    As a “have a go hero” in the blogging world myself (RefuGeeks), this is something I may try out. Like you Jono, I can think of nothing worse than a wall of text. Thosearticles you read were you get to the bottom of the page thinking you’ve come to the end of the article, only to find that the writer in their infinite genius has decided to sprawl an essay over 12 pages are just soul destroying.

    However, on the other hand, good SEO says that an article should be a minimum of 300 words I believe so I don’t think TPB would be a good idea for all posts. I’m certainly happy to give it a go on RefuGeeks though. :)

  • http://www.vishnupadmanabhan.in/ Vishnu Padmanabhan

    True Jono, I do blog myself and this applies to writing as it does for reading. There are many blogs which I sure check out but just skim through them not reading in depth. If I feel its a short one to the point I feel like reading. So I keep my blog posts short while writing, I feel this is the way to go. Now that you have given it a name, lets do it that way! m/

  • http://www.go2linux.org/ Guillermo Garron

    The point Kev is that you should not be writing for S.E.O. But for your readers joy.

    And the three paragraph is not limited to any numbers of words

    By the way, I will try it

  • Joaquín González Cervantes

    Cuenta conmigo =)

  • Ian Weisser

    Aha! That would indeed explain it.

  • Anonymous

    Sounds worth a try. I often find myself not writing a blog post because it usually takes me ages. My general problem is that I feel I need to explain lots of back story. I’ll have to be quite selective to just write 3 points..

  • http://agateau.com/ Aurélien Gâteau

    It’s not a new term, it means “The Pirate Bay” :)

  • http://neuro.me.uk/ neuro

    The medium is not the message.

  • http://www.refugeeks.com/ Kev Quirk

    I don’t write just for SEO, I try to make my articles as engaging for the reader as possible. However, what’s the point in writing an article if people can’t find it? It’s like the old adage, “if a tree falls in the wood and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?”

    If no one reads the article, what’s the point in it even being there? You need to follow good SEO practices even on short TPB articles,

  • http://www.go2linux.org/ Guillermo Garron

    Got your point. :) Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

  • Rok Fajfar

    Depends, sounds pretty interesting though. I’m one of those that rather read a short post with great usable content than a huge bag of paragraphs. Easy to remember and no need to sum up. Supporting the great idea. Together with the simple styling like on medium.com (the right font size and such) it can be quite the hit.

  • Henry Gernhardt

    TPB is nice and concise. By following TPB, one can also offer the /option/ of further exposition. The expository format is simple:

    1: Tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em. (TPB) 2: Tell ‘em. (Sections for each point) 3: Tell ‘em what you told ‘em. (TPB)

    Of course, if one has a lengthy set of lessons/points/filibusters, one can break it up into multiple TPB or expository posts.

  • Anonymous

    I am the same – I like to provide backstory and build up, but this is how I think TPB helps – I makes writing more selective and focused. :-)

  • Anonymous

    That’s just madness. :-)

  • http://ondina.co/ Marco Ceppi

    I think we ran out of three letter acronyms a lot time ago. Time to use context clues!

  • Marie Axelsson

    We could just call it #tpp three point posts instead of blog? :)

  • Marie Axelsson

    I mentioned on G+. I will definitely be giving it a shot myself, since it will help me get over the slump of not writing because I think I have to write so much to get my points across. :)

  • http://RicardoFeliciano.me/ Ricardo N Feliciano

    Not sure how I missed that one. I was on the site at the time too smh.

  • http://RicardoFeliciano.me/ Ricardo N Feliciano

    Works for me.

  • Anonymous

    I decided to give your experiment a try with my latest blog post.

    http://www.starryhope.com/take-a-break-workrave/

  • Bagus Tris Atmaja

    Great Idea from Ubuntu community manager. Just three point paragraph will keep reader read our article. OK, I will adapt it my post. How about image/picture? Image will attract reader more than just writing. According to me, 3p+1i (3 point + 1 image) is the simple best option to post in blog…

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think it would be good to adopt it as a rule, but more as guideline, to keep in mind that less is often more.

  • John Gill

    You may find it takes longer to write a short post cf Blaise Pascal: “I am writing you a long letter because I don’t have time for a short one”.

    I am finding my attention span getting shorter and shorter the more time I spend reading stuff online. I think the problem is that there is so much information available nowadays, if something starts to lose my attention it just seems better use of my time to move on.

    BTW, finding unity under Raring Ringtail much snappier and much smoother, thanks for all the great work.

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