Recommendations Requested: Building a Smart Home

Recommendations Requested: Building a Smart Home

Early next year Erica, the scamp, and I are likely to be moving house. As part of the move we would both love to turn this house into a smart home.

Now, when I say “smart home”, I don’t mean this:

Dogogram. It is the future.

We don’t need any holographic dogs. We are however interested in having cameras, lights, audio, screens, and other elements in the house connected and controlled in different ways. I really like the idea of the house being naturally responsive to us in different scenarios.

In other houses I have seen people with custom lighting patterns (e.g. work, party, romantic dinner), sensors on gates that trigger alarms/notifications, audio that follows you around the house, notifications on visible screens, and other features.

Obviously we will want all of this to be (a) secure, (b) reliable, and (c) simple to use. While we want a smart home, I don’t particularly want to have to learn a million details to set it up.

Can you help?

So, this is what we would like to explore.

Now, I would love to ask you folks two questions:

  1. What kind of smart-home functionality and features have you implemented in your house (in other words, what neat things can you do?)
  2. What hardware and software do you recommend for rigging a home up as a smarthome. I would ideally like to keep re-wiring to a minimum. Assume I have nothing already, so recommendations for cameras, light-switches, hubs, and anything else is much appreciated.

If you have something you would like to share, please plonk it into the comment box below. Thanks!

Building Better Teams With Asynchronous Workflow

Building Better Teams With Asynchronous Workflow

One of the core principles of open source and innersource communities is asynchronous workflow. That is, participants/employees should be able to collaborate together with ubiquitous access, from anywhere, at any time.

As a practical example, at a previous company I worked at, pretty much everything lived in GitHub. Not just the code for the various products, but also material and discussions from the legal, sales, HR, business development, and other teams.

This offered a number of benefits for both employees and the company:

  • History – all projects, discussions, and collaboration was recorded. This provided a wealth of material for understanding prior decisions, work, and relationships.
  • Transparency – transparency is something most employees welcome and this was the case here where all employees felt a sense of connection to work across the company.
  • Communication – with everyone using the same platform it meant that it was easier for people to communicate clearly and consistently and to see the full scope of a discussion/project when pulled in.
  • Accountability – sunlight is the best disinfectant and having all projects, discussions, and work items/commitments, available in the platform ensured people were accountable in both their work and commitments.
  • Collaboration – this platform made it easier for people to not just collaborate (e.g. issues and pull requests) but also to bring in other employees by referencing their username (e.g. @jonobacon).
  • Reduced Silos – the above factors reduced the silos in the company and resulted in wider cross-team collaboration.
  • Untethered Working – because everything was online and not buried in private meetings and notes, this meant employees could be productive at home, on the road, or outside of office hours (often when riddled with jetlag at 3am!)
  • Internationally Minded – this also made it easier to work with an international audience, crossing different timezones and geographical regions.

While asynchronous workflow is not perfect, it offers clear benefits for a company and is a core component for integrating open source methodology and workflows (also known as innersource) into an organization.

Asynchronous workflow is a common area in which I work with companies. As such, I thought I would write up some lessons learned that may be helpful for you folks.

Designing Asynchronous Workflow

Many of you reading this will likely want to bring in the above benefits to your own organization too. You likely have an existing workflow which will be a mixture of (a) in-person meetings, (b) remote conference/video calls, (c) various platforms for tracking tasks, and (d) various collaboration and communication tools.

As with any organizational change and management, culture lies at the core. Putting platforms in place is the easy bit: adapting those platforms to the needs, desires, and uncertainties that live in people is where the hard work lays.

In designing asynchronous workflow you will need to make the transition from your existing culture and workflow to a new way of working. Ultimately this is about designing workflow that generates behaviors we want to see (e.g. collaboration, open discussion, efficient working) and behaviors we want to deter (e.g. silos, land-grabbing, power-plays etc).

Influencing these behaviors will include platforms, processes, relationships, and more. You will need to take a gradual, thoughtful, and transparent approach in designing how these different pieces fit together and how you make the change in a way that teams are engaged in.

I recommend you manage this in the following way (in order):

  1. Survey the current culture – first, you need to understand your current environment. How technically savvy are your employees? How dependent on meetings are they? What are the natural connections between teams, and where are the divisions? With a mixture of (a) employee surveys, and (b) observational and quantitive data, summarize these dynamics into lists of “Behaviors to Improve” and “Behaviors to Preserve”. These lists will give us a sense of how we want to build a workflow that is mindful of these behaviors and adjusts them where we see fit.
  2. Design an asynchronous environment – based on this research, put together a proposed plan for some changes you want to make to be more asynchronous. This should cover platform choices, changes to processes/policies, and roll-out plan. Divide this plan up in priority order for which pieces you want to deliver in which order.
  3. Get buy-in – next we need to build buy-in in senior management, team leads, and with employees. Ideally this process should be as open as possible with a final call for input from the wider employee-base. This is a key part of making teams feel part of the process.
  4. Roll out in phases – now, based on your defined priorities in the design, gradually roll out the plan. As you do so, provide regular updates on this work across the company (you should include metrics of the value this work is driving in these updates).
  5. Regularly survey users – at regular check-points survey the users of the different systems you put in place. Give them express permission to be critical – we want this criticism to help us refine and make changes to the plan.

Of course, this is a simplication of the work that needs to happen, but it covers the key markers that need to be in place.

Asynchronous Principles

The specific choices in your own asynchronous workflow plan will be very specific to your organization. Every org is different, has different drivers, people, and focus, so it is impossible to make a generalized set of strategic, platform, and process recommendations. Of course, if you want to discuss your organization’s needs specifically, feel free to get in touch.

For the purposes of this piece though, and to serve as many of you as possible, I want to share the core asynchronous principles you should consider when designing your asynchronous workflow. These principles are pretty consistent across most organizations I have seen.

Be Explicitly Permissive

A fundamental principle of asynchronous working (and more broadly in innersource) is that employees have explicit permission to (a) contribute across different projects/teams, (b) explore new ideas and creative solutions to problems, and (c) challenge existing norms and strategy.

Now, this doesn’t mean it is a free for all. Employees will have work assigned to them and milestones to accomplish, but being permissive about the above areas will crisply define the behavior the organization wants to see in employees.

In some organizations the senior management team spoo forth said permission and expect it to stick. While this top-down permission and validation is key, it is also critical that team leads, middle managers, and others support this permissive principle in day-to-day work.

People change and cultures develop by others delivering behavioral patterns that become accepted in the current social structure. Thus, you need to encourage people to work across projects, explore new ideas, and challenge the norm, and validate that behavior publicly when it occurs. This is how we make culture stick.

Default to Open Access

Where possible, teams and users should default to open visibility for projects, communication, issues, and other material. Achieving this requires not just default access controls to be open, but also setting the cultural and organization expectation that material should be open for all employees.

Of course, you should trust your employees to use their judgement too. Some efforts will require private discussions and work (e.g. security issues). Also, some discussions may need to be confidential (e.g. HR). So, default to open, but be mindful of the exceptions.

Platforms Need to be Accessible, Rich, and Searchable

There are myriad platforms for asynchronous working. GitHub, GitLab, Slack, Mattermost, Asana, Phabricator, to name just a few.

When evaluating platforms it is key to ensure that they can be made (a) securely accessible from anywhere (e.g. desktop/mobile support, available outside the office), (b) provide a rich and efficient environment for collaboration (e.g. rich discussions with images/videos/links, project management, simple code collaboration and review), (c) and any material is easily searchable (finding previous projects/discussions to learn from them, or finding new issues to focus on).

Always Maintain History and Never Delete, but Archive

You should maintain history in everything you do. This should include discussions, work/issue tracking, code (revision control), releases, and more.

On a related note, you should never, ever permanently delete material. Instead, that material should be archived. As an example, if you file an issue for a bug or problem that is no longer pertinent, archive the issue so it doesn’t come up in popular searches, but still make it accessible.

Consolidate Identity and Authentication

Having a single identity for each employee on asynchronous infrastructure is important. We want to make it easy for people to reference individual employees, so a unique username/handle is key here. This is not just important technically, but also for building relationships – that username/handle will be a part of how people collaborate, build their reputations, and communicate.

A complex challenge with deploying asynchronous infrastructure is with identity and authentication. You may have multiple different platforms that have different accounts and authentication providers.

Where possible invest in Single Sign On and authentication. While it requires a heavier up-front lift, consolidating multiple accounts further down the line is a nightmare you want to avoid.

Validate, Incentivize, and Reward

Human beings need validation. We need to know we are on the right track, particularly when joining new teams and projects. As such, you need to ensure people can easily validate each other (e.g. likes and +1s, simple peer review processes) and encourage a culture of appreciation and thanking others (e.g. manager and leaders setting an example to always thank people for contributions).

Likewise, people often respond well to being incentivized and often enjoy the rewards of that work. Be sure to identify what a good contribution looks like (e.g. in software development, a merged pull request) and incentivize and reward great work via both baked-in features and specific campaigns.

Be Mindful of Uncertainty, so Train, Onboard, and Support

Moving to a more asynchronous way of working will cause uncertainty in some. Not only are people often reluctant to change, but operating in a very open and transparent manner can make people squeamish about looking stupid in front of their colleagues.

So, be sure to provide extensive training as part of the transition, onboard new staff members, and provide a helpdesk where people can always get help and their questions answered.


Of course, I am merely scratching the surface of how we build asynchronous workflow, but hopefully this will get your started and generate some ideas and thoughts about how you bring this to your organization.

Of course, feel free to get in touch if you want to discuss your organization’s needs in more detail. I would also love to hear additional ideas and approaches in the comments!

Luma Giveaway Winner – Garrett Nay

Luma Giveaway Winner – Garrett Nay

I little while back I kicked off a competition to give away a Luma Wifi Set.

The challenge? Share a great community that you feel does wonderful work. The most interesting one, according to yours truly, gets the prize.

Well, I am delighted to share that Garrett Nay bags the prize for sharing the following in his comment:

I don’t know if this counts, since I don’t live in Seattle and can’t be a part of this community, but I’m in a new group in Salt Lake City that’s modeled after it. The group is Story Games Seattle: http://www.meetup.com/Story-Games-Seattle/. They get together on a weekly+ basis to play story games, which are like role-playing games but have a stronger emphasis on giving everyone at the table the power to shape the story (this short video gives a good introduction to what story games are all about, featuring members of the group:

Story Games from Candace Fields on Vimeo.

Story games seem to scratch a creative itch that I have, but it’s usually tough to find friends who are willing to play them, so a group dedicated to them is amazing to me.

Getting started in RPGs and story games is intimidating, but this group is very welcoming to newcomers. The front page says that no experience with role-playing is required, and they insist in their FAQ that you’ll be surprised at what you’ll be able to create with these games even if you’ve never done it before. We’ve tried to take this same approach with our local group.

In addition to playing published games, they also regularly playtest games being developed by members of the group or others. As far as productivity goes, some of the best known story games have come from members of this and sister groups. A few examples I’m aware of are Microscope, Kingdom, Follow, Downfall, and Eden. I’ve personally played Microscope and can say that it is well designed and very polished, definitely a product of years of playtesting.

They’re also productive and engaging in that they keep a record on the forums of all the games they play each week, sometimes including descriptions of the stories they created and how the games went. I find this very useful because I’m always on the lookout for new story games to try out. I kind of wish I lived in Seattle and could join the story games community, but hopefully we can get our fledgling group in Salt Lake up to the standard they have set.

What struck me about this example was that it gets to the heart of what community should be and often is – providing a welcoming, supportive environment for people with like-minded ideas and interests.

While much of my work focuses on the complexities of building collaborative communities with the intricacies of how people work together, we should always remember the huge value of what I refer to as read communities where people simply get together to have fun with each other. Garrett’s example was a perfect summary of a group doing great work here.

Thanks everyone for your suggestions, congratulations to Garrett for winning the prize, and thanks to Luma for providing the prize. Garrett, your Luma will be in the mail soon!

Microsoft and Open Source: A New Era?

Microsoft and Open Source: A New Era?

Last week the Linux Foundation announced Microsoft becoming a Platinum member.

In the eyes of some, hell finally froze over. For many though, myself included, this was not an entirely surprising move. Microsoft are becoming an increasingly active member of the open source community, and they deserve credit for this continual stream of improvements.

When I first discovered open source in 1998, the big M were painted as a bit of a villain. This accusation was largely fair. The company went to great lengths to discredit open source, including comparing Linux to a cancer, patent litigation, and campaigns formed of misinformation and FUD. This rightly left a rather sour taste in the mouths of open source supporters.

The remnants of that sour taste are still strong in some. These folks will likely never trust the Redmond mammoth, their decisions, or their intent. While I am not condoning these prior actions from the company, I would argue that the steady stream of forward progress means that…and I know this will be a tough pill to swallow for some of you…means that it is time to forgive and forget.

Forward Progress

This forward progress is impressive. They released their version of FreeBSD for Azure. They partnered with Canonical to bring Ubuntu user-space to Windows (as well as supporting Debian on Azure and even building their own Linux distribution, the Azure Cloud Switch). They supported an open source version of .NET, known as Mono, later buying Xamarin who led this development and open sourced those components. They brought .NET core to Linux, started their own Linux certification, released a litany of projects (including Visual Studio Code) as open source, founded the Microsoft Open Technologies group, and then later merged the group into the wider organization as openness was a core part of the company.

Microsoft's Satya Nadella seems to have fallen in love.

Satya Nadella, seemingly doing a puppet show, without the puppet.

My personal experience with them has reflected this trend. I first got to know the company back in 2001 when I spoke at a DeveloperDeveloperDeveloper day in the UK. Over the years I flew out to Redmond to provide input on initiatives such as .NET, got to know the Microsoft Open Technologies group, and most recently signed the company as a client where I am helping them to build the next generation of their MVP and RD community. Microsoft are not begrudgingly supporting open source, they are actively pursuing it.

As such, this recent announcement from the Linux Foundation wasn’t a huge surprise to me, but was an impressive formal articulation of Microsoft’s commitment to open source. Leaders at Microsoft and the Linux Foundation should be both credited with this additional important step in the right direction, not just for Microsoft, but for the wider acceptance and growth of open source and collaboration.

Work In Progress

Now, some of the critics will be reading this and will cite many examples of Microsoft still acting as the big bad wolf. You are perfectly right to do so. So, let me zone in on this.

I am not suggesting they are perfect. They aren’t. Companies are merely vessels of people, some of which will still continue to have antiquated perspectives. Microsoft will be no different here. Of course, for all the great steps forward, sometimes there will be some steps back.

What I try to focus on however is the larger story and trends. I would argue that Microsoft is trending in the right direction based on many of their recent moves, including the ones I cited above.

Let’s not forget that this is a big company to turn around. With 114,000 employees and 40+ years of cultural heritage and norms, change understandably takes time. The challenge with change is that it doesn’t just require strategic, product, and leadership focus, but the real challenge is cultural change.

Culture at Microsoft seems to be changing.

Culture is something of an amorphous concept. It isn’t a specific thing you can point to. Culture is instead the aggregate of the actions and intent of the many. You can often make strategic changes that result in new products, services, and projects, but those achievements could be underpinned by a broken, divisive, and ugly culture.

As such, culture is hard to change and requires a mix of top-down leadership and bottom-up action.

From my experience of working with Microsoft, the move to a more open company is not merely based on product-based decisions, but it has percolated in the core culture of how the company operates. I have seen this in my day to day interactions with the company and with my consulting work there. I credit Satya Nadella (and likely many others) for helping to trigger these positive forward motions.

So, are they perfect? No. Are they an entirely different company? No. But are they making a concerted thoughtful effort to really understand and integrate openness into the company? I think so. Is the work complete? No. But do they deserve our support as fellow friends in the open source community? I believe so, yes.

2017 Community Leadership Events: An Update

This week I was delighted to see that we could take the wraps off a new event that I am running in conjunction with my friends at the Linux Foundation called the Community Leadership Conference. The event will be part of the Open Source Summit which was previously known as LinuxCon and I will be running it in Los Angeles from 11th – 13th Sep 2017 and Prague from 23rd – 25th Oct 2017.

Now, some of you may be wondering if this replaces or is different to the Community Leadership Summit in Portland/Austin. Let me add some clarity.

The Community Leadership Summit

The Community Leadership Summit takes place each year the weekend before OSCON. I can confirm that there will be another Community Leadership Summit in 2017 in Austin. We plan to announce this soon formally.

The Community Leadership Summit has the primary goal of bringing together community managers from around the world to discuss and debate community leadership principles. The event is an unconference and is focused on discussions as opposed to formal presentations. As such, and as with any unconference, the thrill of the event is the organic schedule and conversations that follow. Thus, CLS is a great event for those who are interested in playing an active role in furthering the art of and science of community leadership more broadly in an organic way.

The Community Leadership Conference

The Community Leadership Conference, which will be part of the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles and Prague, has a slightly different format and focus.

CLC will instead be a traditional conference. My goal here is to bring together speakers from around the world to deliver presentations, panels, and other material that shares best practices, methods, and approaches in community leadership, and specific to open source. CLC is not intended to shape the future of community leadership, but more to present best practices and principles for consumption, and tailed to the needs of open source projects and organizations.

In Summary

So, in summary, the Community Leadership Conference is designed to be a place to consume community leadership best practices and principles via carefully curated presentations, panels, and networking. The Community Leadership Summit is designed to be more of an informal roll-your-sleeves up summit where attendees discuss and debate community leadership to help shape how it evolves and grows.

As regular readers will know, I am passionate about evolving the art and science of community leadership and while CLS has been an important component in this evolution, I felt we needed to augment it with CLC. These two events, combined with the respective audiences of their shared conferences, and bolstered by my wonderful friends at O’Reilly and the Linux Foundation, are going to help us to evolve this art and science faster and more efficiently than ever.

I hope to see you all at either or both of these events!

Luma Wifi Review and Giveaway

For some reason, wifi has always been the bane of my technological existence. Every house, every router, every cable provider…I have always suffered from bad wifi. I have tried to fix it and in most cases failed.

As such, I was rather excited when I discovered the Luma a little while ago. Put simply, the Luma is a wifi access point, but it comes in multiple units to provide repeaters around your home. The promise of Luma is that this makes it easier to bathe your home in fast and efficient wifi, and comes with other perks such as enhanced security, access controls and more.

So, I pre-ordered one and it arrived recently.

I rather like the Luma so I figured I would write up some thoughts. Stay tuned though, because I am also going to give one away to a lucky reader.

Setup

When it arrived I set it up and followed the configuration process. This was about as simple as you can imagine. The set came with three of these:

luma-kitchen-counter

I plugged each one in turn and the Android app detected each one and configured it. It even recommended where in the house I should put them.

So, I plonked the different Lumas around my house and I was getting pretty reputable speeds.

Usage

Of course, the very best wifi routers blend into the background and don’t require any attention. After a few weeks of use, this has been the case with the Luma. They just sit there working and we have had great wifi across the house.

There are though some interesting features in the app that are handy to have.

Firstly, device management is simple. You can view, remove, and block Internet to different devices and even group devices by person. So, for example, if you neighbors use your Internet from time to time you can group their devices and switch them off if you need precious bandwidth.

Viewing these devices from an app and not an archaic admin panel also makes auditing devices simple. For example, I saw two weird-looking devices on our network and after some research they turned out to be Kindles. Thanks, Amazon, for not having descriptive identifiers for the devices, by the way. 😉

Another neat feature is content filtering. If you have kids and don’t want them to see some naughty content online, you can filter by device or across the whole network. You could also switch off their access when dinner is ready.

So, overall, I am pretty happy with the Luma. Great hardware, simple setup, and reliable execution.

Win a Luma

I want to say a huge thank-you to the kind folks at Luma, because they provided me with an additional Luma to give away here!

Participating is simple. As you know, my true passion in life is building powerful, connected, and productive communities. So, unsurprisingly, I have a question that relates to community:

What is the most interesting, productive, and engaging community you have ever seen?

To participate simply share your answer as a comment on this post. Be sure to tell me which community you are nomating, share pertinant links, and tell me why that community is doing great work. These don’t have to be tech communities – they can be anything, craft, arts, sports, charities, or anything else. I want you to sell me on why the community is interesting and does great work.

Please note: if you include a lot of links, or haven’t posted here before, sometimes comments get stuck in the moderation queue. Rest assured though, I am regularly reviewing the queue and your comment will appear – please don’t submit multiple comments that are the same!

The deadline for submissions is 12pm Pacific time on Fri 18th Nov 2016.

I will then pick my favorite answer and announce the winners. My decision is final and based on what I consider to be the most interesting submission, so no complaining, people. Thanks again to Luma for the kind provision of the prize!

All Things Open Next Week – MCing, Talks, and More

Last year I went to All Things Open for the first time and did a keynote. You can watch the keynote here.

I was really impressed with All Things Open last year and have subsequently become friends with the principle organizer, Todd Lewis. I loved how the team put together a show with the right balance of community and corporation, great content, exhibition and more.

All Thing Open 2016 is happening next week and I will be participating in a number of areas:

  • I will be MCing the keynotes for the event. I am looking forward to introducing such a tremendous group of speakers.
  • Jeremy King, CTO of Walmart Labs and I will be having a fireside chat. I am looking forward to delving into the work they are doing.
  • I will also be participating in a panel about openness and collaboration, and delivering a talk about building a community exoskeleton.
  • It is looking pretty likely I will be doing a book signing with free copies of The Art of Community to be given away thanks to my friends at O’Reilly!

The event takes place in Raleigh, and if you haven’t registered yet, do so right here!

Also, a huge thanks to Red Hat and opensource.com for flying me out. I will be joining the team for a day of meetings prior to All Things Open – looking forward to the discussions!

Bacon Roundup – 28th September 2016

Here we are with another roundup of things I have been working on, complete with a juicy foray into the archives too. So, sit back, grab a cup of something delicious, and enjoy.

To gamify or not to gamify community (opensource.com)

In this piece I explore whether gamification is something we should apply to building communities. I also pull from my experience building a gamification platform for Ubuntu called Ubuntu Accomplishments.

The GitLab Master Plan (gitlab.com)

Recently I have been working with GitLab. The team has been building their vision for conversational development and I MCed their announcement of their plan. You can watch the video below for convenience:


Social Media: 10 Ways To Not Screw It Up (jonobacon.org)

Here I share 10 tips and tricks that I have learned over the years for doing social media right. This applies to tooling, content, distribution, and more. I would love to learn your tips too, so be sure to share them in the comments!

Linux, Linus, Bradley, and Open Source Protection (jonobacon.org)

Recently there was something of a spat in the Linux kernel community about when is the right time to litigate companies who misuse the GPL. As a friend of both sides of the debate, this was my analysis.

The Psychology of Report/Issue Templates (jonobacon.org)

As many of you will know, I am something of a behavioral economics fan. In this piece I explore the interesting human psychology behind issue/report templates. It is subtle nudges like this that can influence the behavioral patterns you want to see.

My Reddit AMA

It would be remiss without sharing a link to my recent reddit AMA where I was asked a range of questions about community leadership, open source, and more. Thanks to all of you who joined and asked questions!

Looking For Talent

I also posted a few pieces about some companies who I am working with who want to hire smart, dedicated, and talented community leaders. If you are looking for a new role, be sure to see these:

From The Archives

Dan Ariely on Building More Human Technology, Data, Artificial Intelligence, and More (forbes.com)

My Forbes piece on the impact of behavioral economics on technologies, including an interview with Dan Ariely, TED speaker, and author of many books on the topic.

Advice for building a career in open source (opensource.com)

In this piece I share some recommendations I have developed over the years for those of you who want to build a career in open source. Of course, I would love to hear you tips and tricks too!

Looking for a data.world Director of Community

data.world

Some time ago I signed an Austin-based data company called data.world as a client. The team are building an incredible platform where the community can store data, collaborate around the shape/content of that data, and build an extensive open data commons.

As I wrote about previously I believe data.world is going to play an important role in opening up the potential for finding discoveries in disparate data sets and helping people innovate faster.

I have been working with the team to help shape their community strategy and they are now ready to hire a capable Director of Community to start executing these different pieces. The role description is presented below. The data.world team are an incredible bunch with some strong heritage in the leadership of Brett Hurt, Matt Laessig, Jon Loyens, Bryon Jacob, and others.

As such, I am looking to find the team some strong candidates. If I know you, I would invite you to confidentially share your interest in this role by filling my form here. This way I can get a good sense of who is interested and also recommend people I personally know and can vouch for. I will then reach out to those of you who this seems to be a good potential fit for and play a supporting role in brokering the conversation.

This role will require candidates to either be based in Austin or be willing to relocate to Austin. This is a great opportunity, and feel free to get in touch with me if you have any questions.

Director of Community Role Description

data.world is building a world-class data commons, management, and collaboration platform. We believe that data.world is the very best place to build great data communities that can make data science fun, enjoyable, and impactful. We want to ensure we can provide the very best support, guidance, and engagement to help these communities be successful. This will involve engagement in workflow, product, outreach, events, and more.

As Director of Community, you will lead, coordinate, and manage our global community development initiatives. You will use your community leadership experience to shape our community experience and infrastructure, feed into the product roadmap with community needs and requirements, build growth and engagement, and more. You will help connect, celebrate, and amplify the existing communities on data.world and assist new ones as they form. You will help our users to think bigger, be the best they can be, and succeed more. You’ll work across teams within data.world to promote the community’s voice within our different internal teams. You should be a content expert, superb communicator, and humble facilitator.

Typical activities for this role include:

  • Building and executing programs that grow communities on data.world and empower them to do great work.
  • Taking a structured approach to community roles, on-boarding, and working with our teams to ensure community members have a simple and powerful experience.
  • Developing content that promotes the longevity and sustainability of fast growing, organically built data communities with high impact outcomes.
  • Building relationships within the industry and community to be their representative for data.world in helping to engage, be successful, and deliver great work and collaboration.
  • Working with product, user operations, and marketing teams on product roadmap for community features and needs.
  • Being a data.world representative and spokesperson at conferences, events, and within the media and external data communities.
  • Always challenging our assumptions, our culture, and being singularly focused on delivering the very best data community platform in the world.

Experience with the following is required:

  • 5-7 years of experience participating in and building communities, preferably data based, or technical in nature.
  • Experience with working in open source, open data, and other online communities.
  • Public speaking, blogging, and content development.
  • Facilitating complex and sensitive community management situations with humility, judgment, tact, and humor.
  • Integrating company brand, voice, and messaging into developed content. Working independently and autonomously, managing multiple competing priorities.

Experience with any of the following preferred:

  • Data science experience and expertise.
  • 3-5 years of experience leading community management programs within a software or Internet-based company.
  • Media training and experience in communicating with journalists, bloggers, and other media on a range of technical topics.
  • Existing network from a diverse set of communities and social media platforms.
  • Software development capabilities and experience

Looking For Talent For ClusterHQ

clusterhq_logo

Recently I signed ClusterHQ as a client. If you are unfamiliar with them, they provide a neat technology for managing data as part of the overall lifecycle of an application. You can learn more about them here.

I will be consulting with Cluster to help them (a) build their community strategy, (b) find a great candidate as Senior Developer Evanglist, and (c) help to mentor that person in their role to be successful.

If you are looking for a new career, this could be a good opportunity. ClusterHQ are doing some interesting work, and if this role is a good fit for you, I will also be there to help you work within a crisply defined strategy and be successful in the execution. Think of it as having a friend on the inside. 🙂

You can learn more in the job description, but you should have these skills:

  • You are a deep full-stack cloud technologist. You have a track record of building distributed applications end-to-end.
  • You either have a Bachelor’s in Computer Science or are self-motivated and self-taught such that you don’t need one.
  • You are passionate about containers, data management, and building stateful applications in modern clusters.
  • You have a history of leadership and service in developer and DevOps communities, and you have a passion for making applications work.
  • You have expertise in lifecycle management of data.
  • You understand how developers and IT organizations consume cloud technologies, and are able to influence enterprise technology adoption outcomes based on that understanding.
  • You have great technical writing skills demonstrated via documentation, blog posts and other written work.
  • You are a social butterfly. You like meeting new people on and offline.
  • You are a great public speaker and are sought after for your expertise and presentation style.
  • You don’t mind charging your laptop and phone in airport lounges so are willing and eager to travel anywhere our developer communities live, and stay productive and professional on the road.
  • You like your weekend and evening time to focus on your outside-of-work passions, but don’t mind working irregular hours and weekends occasionally (as the job demands) to support hackathons, conferences, user groups, and other developer events.

ClusterHQ are primarily looking for help with:

  • Creating high-quality technical content for publication on our blog and other channels to show developers how to implement specific stateful container management technologies.
  • Spreading the word about container data services by speaking and sharing your expertise at relevant user groups and conferences.
  • Evangelizing stateful container management and ClusterHQ technologies to the Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere communities, as well as to DevOPs/IT organizations chartered with operational management of stateful containers.
  • Promoting the needs of developers and users to the ClusterHQ product & engineering team, so that we build the right products in the right way.
  • Supporting developers building containerized applications wherever they are, on forums, social media, and everywhere in between.

Pretty neat opportunity.

Interested?

If you are interested in this role, there are few options for next steps:

  1. You can apply directly by clicking here.
  2. Alternatively, if I know you, I would invite you to confidentially share your interest in this role by filling in my form here. This way I can get a good sense of who is interested and also recommend people I personally know and can vouch for. I will then reach out to those of you who this seems to be a good potential fit for and play a supporting role in brokering the conversation.

By the way, there are going to be a number of these kinds of opportunities shared here on my blog. So, be sure to subscribe to my posts if you want to keep up to date with the latest opportunities.

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