Upcoming Speaking at Interop and Abstractions

I just wanted to share a couple of upcoming speaking engagements going on:

  • Interop in Las Vegas – 5th May 2016 – I will be participating in the keynote panel at Interop this year. The panel is called How Open-Source Changes the IT Equation and I am looking forward to participating with Colin McNamara, Greg Ferro, and Sean Roberts.
  • Abstractions in Pittsburgh – 18-20 Aug 2016 – I will be delivering one of the headlining talks at Abstractions. This looks like an exciting new conference and my first time in Pittsburgh. Looking forward to getting out there!

Some more speaking gigs are in the works. More details soon.

Community Leadership Summit 2016

On 14th – 15th May 2016 in Austin, Texas the Community Leadership Summit 2016 will be taking place. For the 8th year now, community leaders and managers from a range of different industries, professions, and backgrounds will meet together to share ideas and best practice. See our incredible registered attendee list that is shaping up for this year’s event.

This year we also have many incredible keynotes that will cover topics such as building developer communities, tackling imposter syndrome, gamification, governance, and more. Of course CLS will incorporate the popular unconference format where the audience determine the sessions in the schedule.

We are also delighted to host the FLOSS Community Metrics event as part of CLS this year too!

The event is entirely free and everyone is welcome! CLS takes place the weekend before OSCON in the same venue in Austin. Be sure to go and register to join us and we hope to see you in Austin in May!

Many thanks to O’Reilly, Autodesk, and the Linux Foundation for their sponsorship of the event!

Suggestions for Donating a Speaker fee

In August I am speaking at Abstractions and the conference organizers very kindly offered to provide a speaker fee.

Thing is, I have a job and so I don’t need the fee as much as some other folks in the world. As such, I would like to donate the speaker fee to an open source / free software / social good organization and would love suggestions in the comments.

I probably won’t donate to the Free Software Foundations, EFF, or Software Freedom Conservancy as I have already financially contributed to them this year.

Let me know your suggestions in the comments!

Supporting Beep Beep Yarr!

Some of you may be familiar with LinuxVoice magazine. They put an enormous amount of effort in creating a high quality, feature-packed magazine with a small team. They are led by Graham Morrison who I have known for many years and who is one of the most thoughtful, passionate, and decent human beings I have ever met.

Well, the same team are starting an important new project called Beep Beep Yarr!. It is essentially a Kickstarter crowd-funded children’s book that is designed to teach core principles of programming to kids. The project not just involves the creation of the book, but also a parent’s guide and an interactive app to help kids engage with the principles in the book.

They are not looking to raise a tremendous amount of money ($28,684 is the goal converted to mad dollar) and they have already raised $15,952 at the time of writing. I just went and added my support – I can’t wait to read this to our 3 year-old, Jack.

I think this campaign is important for a few reasons. Firstly, I am convinced that learning to program and all the associated pieces (logic flow, breaking problems down into smaller pieces, maths, collaboration) is going to be a critical skill in the future. Programming is not just important for teaching people how to control computers but it also helps people to fundamentally understand and synthesize logic which has knock-on benefits in other types of thinking and problem-solving too.

Beep Beep Yarr! is setting out to provide an important first introduction to these principles for kids. It could conceivably play an essential role in jumpstarting this journey for lots of kids, our own included.

So, go and support the campaign, not just because it is a valuable project, but also because the team behind it are good people who do great work.

The Hybrid Desktop

OK, folks, I want to share a random idea that cropped up after a long conversation with Langridge a few weeks back. This is merely food for thought and designed to trigger some discussion.

Today my computing experience is comprised of Ubuntu and Mac OS X. On Ubuntu I am still playing with GNOME Shell and on Mac I am using the standard desktop experience.

I like both. Both have benefits and disadvantages. My Mac has beautiful hardware and anything I plug into it just works out the box (or has drivers). While I spend most of my life in Chrome and Atom, I use some apps that are not available on Ubuntu (e.g. Bluejeans and Evernote clients). I also find multimedia is just easier and more reliable on my Mac.

My heart will always be with Linux though. I love how slick and simple Shell is and I depend on the huge developer toolchain available to me in Ubuntu. I like how customizable my desktop is and that I can be part of a community that makes the software I use. There is something hugely fulfilling about hanging out with the people who make the tools you use.

So, I have two platforms and use the best of both. The problem is, they feel like two different boxes of things sat on the same shelf. I want to jumble the contents of those boxes together and spread them across the very same shelf.

The Idea

So, imagine this (this is total fantasy, I have no idea if this would be technically feasible.)

You want the very best computing experience, so you first go out and buy a Mac. They have arguably the nicest overall hardware combo (looks, usability, battery etc) out there.

You then download a distribution from the Internet. This is shipped as a .dmg and you install it. It then proceeds to install a bunch of software on your computer. This includes things such as:

  • GNOME Shell
  • All the GNOME 3 apps
  • Various command line tools commonly used on Linux
  • An ability to install Linux packages (e.g. Debian packages, RPMs, snaps) natively

When you fire up the distribution, GNOME Shell appears (or Unity, KDE, Elementary etc) and it is running natively on the Mac, full screen like you would see on Linux. For all intents and purposes it looks and feels like a Linux box, but it is running on top of Mac OS X. This means hardware issues (particularly hardware that needs specific drivers) go away.

Because shell is native it integrates with the Mac side of the fence. All the Mac applications can be browsed and started from Shell. Nautilus shows your Mac filesystem.

If you want to install more software you can use something such as apt-get, snappy, or another service. Everything is pulled in and available natively.

Of course, there will be some integration points where this may not work (e.g. alt-tab might not be able to display Shell apps as well as Mac apps), but importantly you can use your favorite Linux desktop as your main desktop yet still use your favorite Mac apps and features.

I think this could bring a number of benefits:

  • It would open up a huge userbase as a potential audience. Switching to Linux is a big deal for most people. Why not bring the goodness to the Mac userbase?
  • It could be a great opportunity for smaller desktops to differentiate (e.g. Elementary).
  • It could be a great way to introduce people to open source in a more accessible way (it doesn’t require a new OS).
  • It could potentially bring lots of new developers to projects such as GNOME, Unity, KDE, or Elementary.
  • It could significantly increase the level of testing, translations and other supplemental services due to more people being able to play with it.

Of course, from a purely Free Software perspective it could be seen as a step back. Then again, with Darwin being open source and the desktop and apps you install in the distribution being open source, it would be a mostly free platform. It wouldn’t be free in the eyes of the FSF, but then again, neither is Ubuntu. 😉

So, again, just wanted to throw the idea out there to spur some discussion. I think it could be a great project to see. It wouldn’t replace any of the existing Linux distros, but I think it could bring an influx of additional folks over to the open source desktops.

So, two questions for you all to respond to:

  1. What do you think? Could it be an interesting project?
  2. If so, technically how do you think this could be accomplished?

Happy Birthday, Stuart

About 15 years ago I met Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge when he walked into the new Wolverhampton Linux Users Group I had just started with his trademark bombastic personality and humor. Ever since those first interactions we have become really close friends.

Today Stuart turns 40 and I just wanted to share a few words about how remarkable a human being he is.

Many of you who have listened to Stuart on Bad Voltage, seen him speak, worked with him, or socialized with him will know him for his larger than life personality. He is funny, warm, and passionate about his family, friends, and technology. He is opinionated, and many of you will know him for the amusing, insightful, and tremendously articulate way in which he expresses his views.

He is remarkably talented and has an incredible level of insight and perspective. He is not just a brilliant programmer and software architect, but he has a deft knowledge and understanding of people, how they work together, and the driving forces behind human interaction. What I have always admired is that while bombastic in his views, he is always open to fresh ideas and new perspectives. For him life is a journey and new ways of looking at the road are truly thrilling for him.

As I have grown as a person in my career, with my family, and particularly when moving to America, he has always supported yet challenged me. He is one of those rare friends that can enthusiastically validate great steps forward yet, with the same enthusiasm, illustrate mistakes too. I love the fact that we have a relationship that can be so open and honest, yet underlined with respect. It is his personality, understanding, humor, thoughtfulness, care, and mentorship that will always make him one of my favorite people in the world.

Stuart, I love you, pal. Have an awesome birthday, and may we all continue to cherish your friendship for many years to come.

Heading Out To linux.conf.au

On Saturday I will be flying out to linux.conf.au taking place in Geelong. Because it is outrageously far away from where I live, I will arrive on Monday morning. 🙂

I am excited to be joining the conference. The last time I made the trip was sadly way back in 2007 and I had an absolutely tremendous time. Wonderful people, great topics, and well worth the trip. Typically I have struggled to get out with my schedule, but I am delighted to be joining this year.

I will also be delivering one of the keynotes this year. My keynote will be on Thu 4th Feb 2016 at 9am. I will be delving into how we are at potentially the most exciting time ever for building strong, collaborative communities, and sharing some perspectives on how we empower a new generation of open source contributors.

So, I hope to see many of you there. If you want to get together for a meeting, don’t hesitate in getting in touch. You can contact me at jono@github.com for GitHub related discussions, or jono@jonobacon.org for everything else. See you there!

SCALE14x Plans

In a week and a half I am flying out to Pasadena to the SCALE14x conference. I will be there from the evening of Wed 20th Jan 2016 to Sun 24th Jan 2016.

SCALE is a tremendous conference, as I have mentioned many times before. This is a busy year for me, so I wanted to share what I will be up to:

  • Thurs 21st Jan 2016 at 2pm in Ballroom AUbuntu Redux – as part of the UbuCon Summit I will be delivering a presentation about the key patterns that have led Ubuntu to where it is today and my unvarnished perspective on where Ubuntu is going and what success looks like.
  • Thurs 21st Jan 2016 at 7pm – in Ballroom DEFLOSS Reflections – I am delighted to be a part of a session that looks into the past, present, and future of Open Source. The past will be covered by the venerable Jon ‘Maddog’ Hall, the present by myself, and the future by Keila Banks.
  • Fri 22nd Jan 2016 at 10.30am – in Ballroom DE – Ubuntu Panel – I will be hosting a panel where Mark Shuttleworth (Ubuntu Founder), David Planella (Ubuntu Community Manager), Olli Ries (Engineering Manager), and Community Council and community members will be put under the spotlight to illustrate where the future of Ubuntu is going. This is a wonderful opportunity to come along and get your questions answered!
  • Fri 22nd Jan 2016 at 8pm – in Ballroom DEBad Voltage: Live – join us for a fun, informative, and irreverent live Bad Voltage performance. There will be free beer, lots of prizes (including a $2200 Pogo Linux workstation, Zareason Strata laptop, Amazon Fire Stick, Mycroft, Raspberry Pi 2 kit, plenty of swag and more), and plenty of audience participation and surprises. Be sure to join us!
  • Sat 23rd Jan 2016 at 4.30pm – in Ballroom HBuilding Awesome Communities On GitHub – this will be my first presentation in my new role as Director Of Community at GitHub. In it I will be delving into how you can build great communities with GitHub and I will talk about some of the work I will be focused on in my new role and how this will empower communities around the world.

I am looking forward to seeing you all there and if you would like have a meeting while I am there, please drop me an email to jono@github.com.

We Need Your Answers

As I posted about the other day we are doing Bad Voltage Live in Los Angeles in a few weeks. It is on Fri 22nd Jan 2016 at 8pm at the SCALE14x Conference in Los Angeles. Find out more about the show here.

Now, I need every one of you to help provide some answers for a quiz we are doing in the show. It should only take a few minutes to fill in the form and your input could be immortalized in the live show (the show will be recorded and streamed live so you can see it for posterity).

You don’t have to be at the live show or a Bad Voltage listener to share your answers here, so go ahead and get involved!

If you end up joining the show in-person you also have the potential to win some prizes (Mycroft, Raspberry Pi 2 kit, and more!) by providing the most amusing/best answers too. Irrespective of whether you join the show live though, we appreciate if you fill it in:

Go and fill it in by clicking here

Thanks, everyone!

Bad Voltage Live in Los Angeles: Why You Should Be There

On Friday 22nd January 2016 the Bad Voltage team will be delivering a live show at the SCALE14x conference in Pasadena, California.

For those of you unfamiliar with Bad Voltage, it is a podcast that Stuart Langridge, Bryan Lunduke, Jeremy Garcia, and myself do every two weeks that delves into technology, open source, linux, gaming, and more. It features discussions, interviews, reviews and more. It is fun, loose, and informative.

We did our very first Bad Voltage Live show last year at SCALE. To get a sense of it, you can watch it below:

Can’t see the video? Watch it here.

This year is going to be an awesome show, and here are some reasons you should join us.

1. A Fun Show

At the heart of Bad Voltage is a fun show. It is funny, informative, and totally irreverent. This is not just four guys sat on a stage talking. This is a show. It is about spectacle, audience participation, and having a great time.

While we discussed important topics in open source last year we also had a quiz where we made video compilations of people insulting our co-hosts. We even had a half-naked Bryan review a bottle of shampoo in a hastily put together shower prop.

You never know what might happen at a Bad Voltage Live show and that is the fun of it. The audience make the evening so memorable. Be sure to be there!

2. Free Beer (and non-alcoholic beverages)

If there is one thing that people enjoy at conferences is an event with free beer. Well, thanks to our friends at Linode the beer will be flowing. We are also arranging to have soft drinks available too.

So, get along to the show, have a few cold ones and have a great time.

3. Lots of Prizes to be Won

We are firm believers in free stuff. So, we have pulled together a big pile of free stuff that you can all win by joining us at the show.

This includes such wonderful items as:

A Pogo Linux Verona 931H Workstation (thanks to Pogo Linux)

A Zareason Strata laptop (thanks to Zareason)

A Mycroft AI device (thanks to Mycroft)

We will also be giving away a Raspberry Pi 2 kit, Amazon Fire Stick and other prizes!

You can only win these prizes if you join us at the show, so be sure to get along!

4. Free Entry

So, how much does it cost to get into some fun live entertainment, free beer, and a whole host of prizes to be won?

Nothing.

That’s right, the entire show is free to attend.

5. At SCALE

One of the major reasons we like doing Bad Voltage Live at SCALE is because the SCALE conference is absolutely fantastic.

There are a wide range of tracks, varied content, and a wonderful community that attends every year. There are also a range of other events happening as part of SCALE such as the Ubuntu UbuCon Summit.

So, I hope all of this convinces you that Bad Voltage Live is the place to be. I hope to see you there on Friday 22nd January 2016 at 8pm. Find out more here.

Thanks to our sponsors, Linode, Microsoft, Pogo Linux, Zareason, and SCALE.

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